C# – How to match an anonymous type parameter in a mocked method

When an anonymous type is defined in one assembly, it won’t match an anonymous type defined in another assembly. This causes problems when you’re unit testing and trying to mock a method that has an an anonymous type parameter. For example, let’s say you’re trying to unit test the following method: To unit test this, … Read more

ASP.NET Core – How to unit test your middleware class

There are three requirements for unit testing a middleware class: Mock out RequestDelegate by defining a lambda that returns a Task (Task.FromException, Task.FromResult, or Task.FromCanceled). Mock out HttpContext by using DefaultHttpContext. The middleware function needs to be awaited, so your unit test needs to be defined with async Task. Here’s an example: This is a … Read more

ASP.NET Core – How to change the JSON serialization settings

System.Text.Json is the default JSON serializer in ASP.NET Core. It uses the following default serialization settings: To change the settings at the service level for all controllers, call AddJsonOptions() in Startup.ConfigureServices() like this: Note: This example is passing in JsonStringEnumConverter, which makes JsonSerializer use the enum name instead of enum value. When you change the … Read more

C# – Get and send JSON with HttpClient

The simplest way to get and send JSON with HttpClient is to use the GetFromJsonAsync() and PostAsJsonAsync() extension methods found in System.Net.Http.Json, like this: Note: You have to install the System.Net.Http.Json nuget package if you’re using a framework version before .NET 5. These extension methods use System.Text.Json for serialization. They simplify things by abstracting away … Read more

System.Text.Json – Using anonymous types to customize serialization

It’s common to need to customize serialization. When you need to do this, you’d typically need to create a custom converter and pass it in during serialization. Depending on your scenario, an alternative approach is to use anonymous types, like this: Basically you select properties from another object and format them as desired, and then … Read more

System.Text.Json.JsonException: The JSON value could not be converted to System.DateTime

When deserializing a datetime value with System.Text.Json.JsonSerializer, if the value isn’t in the format it expects, then it’ll throw a JsonException. It expects datetimes to be in the ISO-8601-1:2019 format (for example: 2021-07-12T12:35:34+00:00). For example, the following code is trying to deserialize a datetime value in an unexpected format: This’ll throw the following exception: System.Text.Json.JsonException: … Read more

Deserializing JSON that contains an embedded JSON string

When you send mail, you put a letter in an envelope and put routing information on the envelope. The postal service uses the routing information to deliver the envelope to a specific mailbox. The mailbox owner then opens the envelope and reads the letter. Sometimes you may need to deal with the JSON equivalent of … Read more

System.InvalidOperationException: Serializer options cannot be changed once serialization or deserialization has occurred

Problem When using System.Text.Json, it’s a good idea to reuse JsonSerializerOptions objects. This leads to a massive 200x speedup in subsequent calls to the serializer. The downside is you can’t change properties on the options object after you’ve passed it in a Serialize()/Deserialize() call. You’ll get the exception: System.InvalidOperationException: Serializer options cannot be changed once … Read more