ASP.NET Core – How to change the JSON serialization settings

System.Text.Json is the default JSON serializer in ASP.NET Core. It uses the following default serialization settings: To change the settings at the service level for all controllers, call AddJsonOptions() in Startup.ConfigureServices() like this: Note: This example is passing in JsonStringEnumConverter, which makes JsonSerializer use the enum name instead of enum value. When you change the … Read more

C# – Get and send JSON with HttpClient

The simplest way to get and send JSON with HttpClient is to use the GetFromJsonAsync() and PostAsJsonAsync() extension methods found in System.Net.Http.Json, like this: Note: You have to install the System.Net.Http.Json nuget package if you’re using a framework version before .NET 5. These extension methods use System.Text.Json for serialization. They simplify things by abstracting away … Read more

System.Text.Json – Using anonymous types to customize serialization

It’s common to need to customize serialization. When you need to do this, you’d typically need to create a custom converter and pass it in during serialization. Depending on your scenario, an alternative approach is to use anonymous types, like this: Basically you select properties from another object and format them as desired, and then … Read more

System.Text.Json – Use JsonConverterFactory to serialize multiple types the same way

Let’s say you want to serialize the four datetime types – DateTime, DateTime?, DateTimeOffset, and DateTimeOffset? – in the same way. You want to serialize them to use the US date style (ex: 7/14/2021). There are two main ways to accomplish this: Create a custom converter for each type. Create a custom converter factory + … Read more

System.Text.Json – How to serialize non-public properties

By default, the System.Text.Json.JsonSerializer only serializes public properties. If you want to serialize non-public properties, you can create a custom converter and use reflection to get the non-public properties too, like this: Use the custom converter by adding it to JsonSerializerOptions.Converters and passing the options in when serializing, like this: In this article, I’ll show … Read more

System.Text.Json.JsonException: The JSON value could not be converted to System.DateTime

When deserializing a datetime value with System.Text.Json.JsonSerializer, if the value isn’t in the format it expects, then it’ll throw a JsonException. It expects datetimes to be in the ISO-8601-1:2019 format (for example: 2021-07-12T12:35:34+00:00). For example, the following code is trying to deserialize a datetime value in an unexpected format: This’ll throw the following exception: System.Text.Json.JsonException: … Read more

System.Text.Json – How to customize serialization with JsonConverter

Most of the time JsonSerializer will get you want you want. You can pass in options to control serialization to a certain extent. But sometimes you’ll run into scenarios where you need to customize how it handles serialization for a specific type. This is where JsonConverter comes in. To customize serialization for a specific type, … Read more

C# – Using SqlDataReader to process multiple result sets

In this article I’ll show how to use the SqlDataReader ADO.NET class in two scenarios involving multiple result sets: Batches – When you execute multiple SELECTs in a single query. Each SELECT returns a different result set. You use a single reader to process the batch. Nested Queries – When you use multiple SqlDataReaders on … Read more

System.InvalidOperationException: Serializer options cannot be changed once serialization or deserialization has occurred

Problem When using System.Text.Json, it’s a good idea to reuse JsonSerializerOptions objects. This leads to a massive 200x speedup in subsequent calls to the serializer. The downside is you can’t change properties on the options object after you’ve passed it in a Serialize()/Deserialize() call. You’ll get the exception: System.InvalidOperationException: Serializer options cannot be changed once … Read more