C# – How to parse XML with XElement (Linq)

Use the XElement class (from the Linq-to-Xml API) to parse XML and work with it in memory. You can use this to search for XML elements, attributes, and modify values. This is an alternative to deserializing to an object (which requires you to define a class that matches the XML structure). I’ll show examples of … Read more

C# – Read XML element attributes with XElement (Linq)

XML elements can have attributes, which are key-value pairs. To read the attributes, use the XElement class (from the Linq-to-Xml API). There are two main methods for getting attributes: Once you have the attributes, use the XAttribute.Value property to read the attribute’s string value. Here’s an example of getting all elements named Movie and then … Read more

C# – Select a single row with Dapper

The simplest way to select a single row with Dapper is to use QuerySingleOrDefault() with a SELECT + WHERE query. You can pass in the parameters to specify which record to select and specify the model type. Here’s an example: The SQL query returns a single row from the Movies table and Dapper maps it … Read more

C# – Update records with Dapper

You can update records with Dapper by using Execute() with an UPDATE statement and passing in the parameters. Here’s an example: Dapper maps the properties from the param object to the query parameters (ex: it maps year to @year). You can pass in the parameters with an anonymous type (as shown above) or by passing … Read more

C# – Insert records with Dapper

You can insert records with Dapper by using Execute() on an INSERT statement and passing in a model object. Here’s an example of inserting a single movie record: Notice that you can simply pass in an object (param: movie) and Dapper handles the tedious parameter mapping for you. It tries to map properties from the … Read more

C# – Delete records with Dapper

You can delete records with Dapper by using Execute() with a DELETE statement and specifying the record ID as a parameter. Here’s an example: This deletes a single record from the Movies table. Delete multiple records When you’re deleting multiple records, you can efficiently execute a single DELETE statement with a WHERE clause including all … Read more

C# – Execute a stored procedure with Dapper

You can execute stored procedures with Dapper by specifying the name, parameters, and CommandType.StoredProcedure. Let’s say you have the following stored procedure (single parameter, returns movie rows): Here’s how to execute this stored procedure with Dapper and map its results to Movie objects: Use an output parameter To get a stored procedure’s output parameter, add … Read more

SQL – Aggregate functions with GROUP BY

There are five main aggregate functions in SQL: COUNT(), SUM(), AVG(), MIN(), and MAX(). These calculate aggregate values for sets of rows. When you use them with GROUP BY, they calculate the aggregate values for each group. Let’s say you want to get movie streaming stats for each user. Here’s an example of using GROUP … Read more

SQL – Using GROUP BY with ORDER BY

GROUP BY groups rows based on one or more column and produces grouped rows. ORDER BY sorts rows. You can use these together to sort groups. There are two options you can use for sorting groups: I’ll show examples below. At the end, I’ll talk about how SQL Server may implicitly sort groups (and why … Read more

C# – How to change StreamWriter’s buffer size

StreamWriter buffers by writing data to an internal char array with a default size of 1024 (and a minimum size of 128). Once the buffer is full (or when you dispose the StreamWriter), it flushes the buffer to the underlying stream. You can change StreamWriter’s buffer size by passing in the bufferSize parameter. Here’s an … Read more

C# – How to make a file read-only

There are two ways to programmatically make a file read-only: Here’s an example showing both ways to make a file read-only: Using File.SetAttributes() is useful when you want to manage all of file’s attributes at once. FileAttributes is an enum flag, so you can use bitwise operations to add/remove multiple attributes at once. That’s why … Read more

C# – How to set permissions for a directory (Windows only)

When you want to set permissions for a directory (and its files/subdirectories), you can use DirectoryInfo.GetAccessControl() to get the directory’s security, add/modify/remove access control rules, and then use DirectoryInfo.SetAccessControl() to apply the changes. Access control rules are a complex combination of different settings. So before jumping into setting the permissions programmatically, I suggest taking a … Read more

C# – How to delete a directory

The simplest way to delete a directory is by using Directory.Delete() (in System.IO). You specify the directory path (absolute or relative) and an optional parameter that tells it to delete everything in the directory. Here’s an example of how to use this to delete directories: Note: If you’re working with DirectoryInfo objects already, you can … Read more

C# – How to create directories

You can use Directory.CreateDirectory() to create a directory at the specified path (absolute or relative), like this: This creates the directory if it doesn’t exist, otherwise it does nothing. That means you don’t need to check if the directory exists before calling Directory.CreateDirectory(). In this article, I’ll go into more details about using Directory.CreateDirectory(). CreateDirectory() … Read more

C# – How to update a file’s contents

There are three ways to update a file’s content: Which option you pick depends on the file’s format and size. For example, if you’re writing to an existing CSV file, you’d append new lines to the end of the file. If you’re updating a JSON file, you’d read all the JSON content, make changes, then … Read more

C# – How to search for files in a directory

You can use Directory.EnumerateFiles() (in System.IO) to search for files in a directory. This has many overloads, allowing you to specify exactly what you want. You can get all the files in a directory, get all files in all subdirectories, filter files by name (including extension), and filter by attributes. Here’s an example of getting … Read more

C# – How to read a file

The simplest way to read a file is to use a high-level method in the .NET File API (in System.IO), such as File.ReadAllText(). These high-level methods abstract away the details of opening a file stream, reading it with StreamReader, and closing the file. Here’s an example of reading a text file’s content using File.ReadAllText(): Notice … Read more

C# – How to create a file and write to it

There are a few ways to create a file and write to it using the .NET File API (in System.IO). The simplest way is to use high-level methods like File.WriteAllText() and File.WriteAllLines(), specifying the file path and string(s) to write to the file. Here’s an example of using these (and their async equivalents): These high-level … Read more

C# – How to delete a file

You can use System.IO.File.Delete() to delete a file by specifying its relative or absolute path. Here’s an example: Note: Unlike other methods in the File API, there’s no async version of File.Delete(). If the specified file exists and the permissions are right, then File.Delete() deletes the file as expected. If there’s a problem, it throws … Read more

ASP.NET Core – Receive a request with CSV data

There are two ways to receive CSV data in a web API: Receive CSV as a file in a multipart/form-data request. Receive CSV as a string in a text/csv request. In this article, I’ll show examples of both of these approaches. I’ll be using the CsvHelper library to parse CSV data into model objects and … Read more

Get data from an API in React

In this article, I’ll show how to make a request to an API to get data and then display it in a React component. This can be broken down into three steps: Initialize two state variables with useState(): one for the data, one for errors. Make the API request with axios in useEffect() and set … Read more