C# – Deserialize JSON to a derived type

The simplest way to deserialize JSON to a derived type is to put the type name in the JSON string. Then during deserialization, match the type name property against a set of known derived types and deserialize to the target type. System.Text.Json doesn’t have this functionality out of the box. That’s because there’s a known … Read more

C# – Examples of using JsonDocument to read JSON

You can use the JsonDocument class when you want to read and process JSON without having to deserialize the whole thing to an object. For example, let’s say you have the following JSON object representing wind variables: Now let’s say you’re only interested in the wind speed. Instead of having to deserialize this into a … Read more

C# – Populate an existing object with JSON

Normally when you’re working with JSON, you deserialize it to a target type and get back an initialized and fully populated object. How about if you need to initialize an object yourself, and then populate it with JSON later? For example, let’s say you want to load the following JSON array into a case-insensitive HashSet: … Read more

System.Text.Json – Deserialize properties that aren’t part of the class

Use the JsonExtensionData attribute to simplify accepting additional properties in JSON that aren’t part of the class you’re deserializing to. To use this attribute, add a compatible* property to the class and apply the JsonExtensionData attribute: *Compatible property types you can use are Dictionary<string, object>, Dictionary<string, JsonElement> and JsonObject. Any property in the JSON that’s … Read more