A fatal error occurred. The required library hostfxr.dll could not be found

Problem You are trying to run a .NET executable and you get the following error: A fatal error occurred. The required library hostfxr.dll could not be found.If this is a self-contained application, that library should exist in [C:\MyApp].If this is a framework-dependent application, install the runtime in the global location [C:\Program Files\dotnet] or use the … Read more

C# – Connect to a MySQL database

The simplest way to connect to a MySQL database in a .NET project is to use the MySql.Data package (from Oracle). It provides classes that implement the standard ADO.NET interfaces (such as IDbConnection). First, add the MySql.Data package to your project (this is using View > Other Windows > Package Manager Console): Now use the … Read more

C# – Use SortedSet to keep a collection of elements sorted at all times

When you have a collection of elements that you’re continuing to add to, and need to keep the objects in sorted order at all times, you can use SortedSet. Internally, it uses a tree data structure to keep elements in sorted order (O(log n) insertion). This is far more efficient than repeatedly sorting a list … Read more

C# – Deserialize JSON to a derived type

The simplest way to deserialize JSON to a derived type is to put the type name in the JSON string. Then during deserialization, match the type name property against a set of known derived types and deserialize to the target type. System.Text.Json doesn’t have this functionality out of the box. That’s because there’s a known … Read more

C# – Examples of using JsonDocument to read JSON

You can use the JsonDocument class when you want to read and process JSON without having to deserialize the whole thing to an object. For example, let’s say you have the following JSON object representing wind variables: Now let’s say you’re only interested in the wind speed. Instead of having to deserialize this into a … Read more

C# – Populate an existing object with JSON

Normally when you’re working with JSON, you deserialize it to a target type and get back an initialized and fully populated object. How about if you need to initialize an object yourself, and then populate it with JSON later? For example, let’s say you want to load the following JSON array into a case-insensitive HashSet: … Read more

C# – Simple way to implement GetHashCode() and Equals()

The simplest way to implement GetHashCode() is to use the built-in System.HashCode.Combine() method and pick the properties you want to include. Let it do the work for you. Furthermore, the simplest way to implement Equals() is to use the is operator and compare all the properties. Here’s an example: Note: Use (Title, Year).GetHashCode() in versions … Read more

C# – How to ignore JSON deserialization errors

One error during deserialization can cause the whole process to fail. Consider the following JSON. The second object has invalid data (can’t convert string to int), which will result in deserialization failing: With Newtonsoft, you can choose to ignore deserialization errors. To do that, pass in an error handling lambda in the settings: This outputs … Read more

C# – Use records as a shortcut for defining DTOs

You can declare a record with a single line of code: Note: This feature was added in .NET 5 / C# 9. Records are basically classes (reference types) that work very well as simple data containers (i.e. DTOs). Here’s an example of using a record: This outputs the following: As shown, when you declare a … Read more

C# – Deserialize a JSON array to a list

When you’re working with a JSON array, you can deserialize it to a list like this: This deserializes all of the objects in the JSON array into a List<Movie>. You can use this list object like usual. Note: All examples will use System.Collections.Generic and System.Text.Json. I’ll exclude the using statements for brevity. Example – JSON … Read more