ASP.NET Core – How to unit test your middleware class

There are three requirements for unit testing a middleware class: Mock out RequestDelegate by defining a lambda that returns a Task (Task.FromException, Task.FromResult, or Task.FromCanceled). Mock out HttpContext by using DefaultHttpContext. The middleware function needs to be awaited, so your unit test needs to be defined with async Task. Here’s an example: This is a … Read more

C# – Use FluentAssertions to improve unit tests

FluentAssertions is a library that improves unit tests by providing better failure messages, simplifies assertions in many scenarios, and provides a fluent interface (which improves code readability). In this article, I’ll show a few examples of how FluentAssertions can improve unit tests by comparing it with the built-in assertions (from Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting). Install FluentAssertions To get … Read more

C# – Parameterized tests in xUnit

Here’s an example of adding a parameterized unit test in xUnit: To parameterize a unit test, you have to do three things: Add the [Theory] attribute. Add the parameters to the unit test method. In the example above, there are four parameters. Add one [InlineData] for each combo of data you want to test. If … Read more

ASP.NET Core – How to unit test an ApiController

The key to unit testing an ApiController class is to mock out all of its dependencies, including the controller’s HttpContext property, like this: If the controller method you’re testing uses anything from the HttpContext, then you’ll want to swap in your own value. Otherwise HttpContext will be null and you’ll get a NullReferenceException. Fortunately Microsoft … Read more

C# – Join strings with a separator, ignoring nulls and empty strings

Normally when you want to join strings using a separator, you’d use string.Join(). However, the problem with string.Join() is it doesn’t ignore nulls or empty strings. Take a look at the following examples: If you want to filter out nulls and empty strings, you can filter the list of strings yourself and pass it into … Read more

C# – Convert a list of strings into a set of enums

Let’s say you have a list of HTTP status codes that you read in when the service starts up (perhaps from appsettings.json or from the database). Whenever you send an HTTP request, you want to check if the returned status code is in this list of status code. To make things more efficient, you want … Read more

C# – Unit test doesn’t finish and stops all other tests from running

Problem You have a unit test that doesn’t finish, and it prevents other tests from running. There’s no indication that the test passed or failed. It just stops running. When you run all of the tests together, some tests might finish, but once this one bad test stops, it prevents other tests from running. This … Read more

C# – How to unit test code that uses Dapper

Dapper makes your code difficult to unit test. The problem is that Dapper uses static extension methods, and static methods are difficult to mock out. One approach is to wrap the Dapper static methods in a class, extract out an interface for that wrapper class, and then dependency inject the wrapper interface. In the unit … Read more

Python – Expect an exception using pytest

When you want to add a test to verify that an exception is raised, you can use pytest.raises() like this: When the code doesn’t raise an exception, you’ll see a test failed message like this: Example – Expect WordCounter to raise an exception I’m implementing the following WordCounter class using a test-driven approach. The first … Read more

C# – Use StringAssert when testing a string for substrings

When you’re testing if two strings are equal, you can simply use Assert.AreEqual(). When you’re testing if a string contains a substring or a pattern, typically developers use Assert.IsTrue() with a substring method or regex. You should use StringAssert instead, because it gives better failure messages. The key problem is Assert.IsTrue() gives useless information. You … Read more