C# – Join strings with a separator, ignoring nulls and empty strings

Normally when you want to join strings using a separator, you’d use string.Join(). However, the problem with string.Join() is it doesn’t ignore nulls or empty strings. Take a look at the following examples: If you want to filter out nulls and empty strings, you can filter the list of strings yourself and pass it into … Read more

C# – Remove a set of characters from a string

The fastest and simplest way to remove a set of characters from a string is to use StringBuilder + List<char>, like this: I compared this with three other approaches. I did 100,000 iterations with a string with 2500 characters and a list of 15 characters to remove. This StringBuilder approach is almost 2x faster than … Read more

C# – Convert a list of strings into a set of enums

Let’s say you have a list of HTTP status codes that you read in when the service starts up (perhaps from appsettings.json or from the database). Whenever you send an HTTP request, you want to check if the returned status code is in this list of status code. To make things more efficient, you want … Read more

C# – Unit test doesn’t finish and stops all other tests from running

Problem You have a unit test that doesn’t finish, and it prevents other tests from running. There’s no indication that the test passed or failed. It just stops running. When you run all of the tests together, some tests might finish, but once this one bad test stops, it prevents other tests from running. This … Read more

C# – How to unit test code that uses Dapper

Dapper makes your code difficult to unit test. The problem is that Dapper uses static extension methods, and static methods are difficult to mock out. One approach is to wrap the Dapper static methods in a class, extract out an interface for that wrapper class, and then dependency inject the wrapper interface. In the unit … Read more

Algorithm Explained: Determine if two strings have a substring in common

Problem statement: Given two strings, determine if they have a substring in common. Example: Do “hello world” and “world” have a substring in common? Yes, they both have the substring “world”. Approach What are all the substrings of string? The string “word” is four characters long. It contains 10 substrings between length 1 and 4. … Read more

Python – Expect an exception using pytest

When you want to add a test to verify that an exception is raised, you can use pytest.raises() like this: When the code doesn’t raise an exception, you’ll see a test failed message like this: Example – Expect WordCounter to raise an exception I’m implementing the following WordCounter class using a test-driven approach. The first … Read more

Refactoring the Nested Conditionals code smell

Nested conditionals are a code smell because they make the code harder to understand. They tend to grow more and more complicated over time because developers will keep adding conditions and more levels of nesting. The deeper the nesting, the more time it’ll eventually take to refactor it. Code Smell: Nested conditionals.Definition: A conditional block … Read more

C# – Use StringAssert when testing a string for substrings

When you’re testing if two strings are equal, you can simply use Assert.AreEqual(). When you’re testing if a string contains a substring or a pattern, typically developers use Assert.IsTrue() with a substring method or regex. You should use StringAssert instead, because it gives better failure messages. The key problem is Assert.IsTrue() gives useless information. You … Read more

C# – Default method implementations and constants in interfaces

Starting in C# 7, you can add default method implementations (and constants) to interfaces, like this: This outputs the following: Microsoft’s stated purpose for this feature is that it allows you add methods to an interface without breaking existing implementing classes. That’s nice, but it weakens the concept of interfaces (forcing implementers to adhere to … Read more